Remote Southeast Indonesia - The Bandar Sea: 17Oct - 5 Nov 2011


Thailand


World

 

Overview

With James Eaton, Rob Hutchinson, Ron and Sue Johns, John Gregory, John Lobel, Denzil Morgan, Josep and Dolors del Hoyo, Hemme Batjes and Peter Maaskant. This exploratory trip was organised by James and Rob of Bird Tour Asia, with the aim of visiting the remote, mostly never-birded, islands of southeast Indonesia east of Flores. Due to lack of infrastructure the only practical way to visit these islands is to charter a ship. Most of these islands have only been visited by any naturalist once, or at most a handful of times, since original collections were made in the 1800's and early 1900's. The trip was extremely successful and enjoyable with Wetar being particularly memorable for its largely pristine forests and abundant birds, contrasting strongly with most of this environmentally scarred archipelago. Due to access and logistical difficulties this will no doubt continue to be a forgotten and ornithologically neglected area in the near future. The trip started from Flores with visits to Tanahjampea, Pantar, Alor, Pulau Reong, Wetar, Leti, Pulau Terbang Selatan, Damar, Babar, Anggarmasa and Tanimbar. Weather was mostly dry with a few heavy rain showers at sea the first couple of days as well as on Wetar. Sea conditions moderate to calm throughout, with an easterly swell. Hot to very hot.

Banda Sea

Itinerary

17 Oct. Thai Airways flight to Bangkok with, unfortunately, an overnight stop due to no convenient connection. On the short drive to the hotel - the usual Silver Gold Garden - still much evidence of the flooding that has plagued northern and central Thailand this past wet season.

18 Oct. Departed, on time around 09:00, on Thai Airways and arrived four hours later at Denpasar, Bali. Quite efficient here - paid the $25 visa on arrival fee, collected baggage and outside met by Raja, our "Mr. Fixit" for the trip. Afternoon and overnight at the Quest Hotel which, as to be our last chance for Internet, was made the most of. Dinner at restaurant adjacent. Met up with rest of group.

MV Maharatiku
Matahariku

Tanahjumpea
Tanahjampea

Children on Tanahjumpea
Children on Tanahjampea

Children on Tanahjumpea
Snazzy fruit bat

19 Oct. Early breakfast at 05:30 and headed back to the airport for the 07:00 Trans Nusa flight to Labuanbajo on Flores, which arrived only 15 minutes late. Transferred to the ship, the Matahariku, which proved to be a pleasant surprise, reasonably spacious and fairly well maintained. Loaded the beer and headed out to sea around 11:00. Calm waters and very hot. A few terns initially, comprising Greater Crested Tern, Common Tern plus a single Black-naped Tern. A couple of hours out to sea and the water depth increased with the first Bulwer’s Petrel, a few Streaked Shearwater, Wilson’s Storm Petrel, Brown Booby, Red-footed Booby and some Arctic Skua. A few Spinner Dolphin. Darkness arrived around 18:00. A calm sea all day with the ship averaging around six knots.

20 Oct. We'd expected to arrive at Tanahjampea during the night, but a slowing of the vessel put us into the cove outside Labuhanmarege village at 05:00. The first task was to visit the village head to seek permission to walk in their forest. Although no birders have visited Tanahjampea since 1993, the occasional boat does show up in the cove, though few put ashore. An early scan of forest from the ship revealed a few distant Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon, Great-billed Parrot and Pacific Swift. Permission received, and an hour later we were ashore with four locals accompanying us to the forest. Finding any track into the forest proved impossible so we had to manage with a trek through cashew plantations and fields bordering forest edge. Common birds included Arafura Fantail, Clement's Sunbird - the all black race of Olive-backed Sunbird - and Black-faced Munia. Hot and humid already by 09:00. At the first really forested gully we found Tanahjampea Blue Flycatcher and White-tipped Monarch; only the second birders ever to see these species. Pigeons and doves very much in evidence with good numbers of Black-naped Fruit Dove, Elegant Imperial Pigeon, Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon plus a few Bar-necked Cuckoo-Dove. A nice surprise was a pair of Orange-footed Scrubfowl at close range. Clearly there's little hunting/trapping pressure on the island. Farther along we disturbed a Large-tailed Nightjar in understory of cashew plantations. By midday we had completed a six kilometre trek through dry, noisy leaves to arrive at a small dam, now dried up, where we took lunch. Good views of the forest from here, but nothing of note in the heat of the day. After lunch walked up a stream bed into the forest to a couple of plantations. A few more White-tipped Monarch and Tanahjampea Blue Flycatcher as well as good numbers of pigeons in fruiting trees. Around 16:00, with the cooling of the temperature, headed out of the forest where scans of the hillsides produced several Great-billed Parrot and a few Short-tailed Starling. At dusk we’d expected to hear/see nightjars along the forest edge but nothing, so trekked back to the beach recording a couple of Large-tailed Nightjar, as well as Common Palm Civet and a very snazzy fruit bat. Great views of the Milky Way - certainly no light pollution at here! Back to ship well after dark and after the long hot trek in the heat, some welcome beers.

21 Oct. Heavy rain early morning showed where all the leaks were on the boat, including a few straight into the cabins. A lie-in till daybreak was managed with the aid of a plastic box to catch water, then on deck for some early seabirds. A few Bridled Tern, and at a fish feeding frenzy good numbers of Red-footed Booby and Sooty Tern. The rest of the day on deck with odd passing seabirds including Long-tailed Skua, Red-billed Tropicbird and Sooty Shearwater, the latter two apparently unrecorded in Wallacea. Sea swell increasing throughout the day with the ship both pitching and rolling, so by evening several people feeling unwell and off for an early night.

22 Oct. A bit of a rough night, but fortunately no further rain. Sea calming by mid morning. A few early birds from the deck included Swinhoe’s Storm Petrel, Brown Noddy and a single Wilson’s Storm Petrel. Arrived off Baranusa, Pantar around 11:00. Once heavy rainfall over lunch had abated we took to the small boats and motored up the large estuary behind Baranusa to be dropped off in forest behind the mangroves. First species observed were Sunda Pygmy Woodpecker, Flame-breasted Sunbird, Wallacean Cuckooshrike, Rainbow Bee-eater and Black-naped Fruit Dove. Spent a couple of hours wandering cross-country to eventually arrive on the small paved road leading back to town. At dusk searched for Alor Boobook, but had to work hard to find a single bird more than a kilometre from the road. A late boat back from the mangroves to the ship which immediately set sail for Alor.

Sunset off Alor
Sunset off Alor

Western Wetar
Western Wetar

23 Oct. A very short night, as up again at 04:00 and to the harbour where pre-arranged vehicles met us. Unfortunately, as might be expected in Indonesia, two of the vehicles needed fuel, so we did a runaround trying to find a fuel station open at that hour. Once that settled had to stop again to put air in the tyres. Eventually left Kalabahi town at 05:45 and headed up into the badly degraded mountains toward Mainang. First stop at 900 metres had several singing Timor Bush Warbler, but despite close approach, no one was able to obtain a view. Headed down hill a little and tried again without success. Walked back up to the area we'd started via a grassy track off-road where we discovered singing bush warblers either side of a wide, cleared path. This looked promising and in the next hour we obtained brief views of at least two Timor Bush Warbler crisscrossing the path. Back to the vehicles, unexpectedly scoring Timor Stubtail en route. Headed farther into the hills but broken bridges and landslides meant we were unable to reach the area we wanted, so had to settle on finding a track into the hills. This proved rather challenging for the Toyota Avanza and took several attempts, and villagers pushing to get us up to 1,000 metres south of Mainang. The very open eucalyptus woodland held Indonesian Honeyeater, Ashy-bellied White-eye, Oilve-headed Lorikeet, Lesser Shortwing and a couple of Timor Bush Warbler. Heavy rain after lunch concluded our trip here, so returned to boat to start longer journey to Wetar.

24 Oct. A pretty rough night with deteriorating sea conditions still choppy early morning, but calming by midday. Few seabirds around other than the usual suspects including Bridled Tern, Arctic Skua, Brown Noddy, many Red-necked Phalarope and Red-footed Booby. Several whale sightings with a close Sperm Whale. At 14:00 stopped at Pulau Reong, a small island off Wetar, for an hour and inspected a short trail into forest behind the beach. In the heat of the day recorded Fawn-breasted Whistler, Spectacled Monarch, Island Monarch, Barred Dove and Pacific Swift, but not the hoped for Wetar Ground Dove. Lifted anchor and headed to northwest Wetar where we arrived at dusk.

25 Oct. A very early start at 03:45 in order to reach forest by dawn. Took the boats to the beach of Naumatong village, where with local guides we walked the 2.5 kilometres through fields and cultivation to the river. No night birds calling. Spent the next six hours slowly walking up river covering a further two to three kilometres. Impressive scenery and habitat; even more so with the large number of pigeons and doves we encountered which are seemingly not hunted. Timor Black Pigeon really common, and once into pristine forest Timor Imperial Pigeon not uncommon. Best find was several Wetar Ground Dove. Other Wetar and Timor specialities included Wetar Figbird, Timor Stubtail, Crimson-hooded Myzomela, Wetar Oriole and Black-necklaced Honeyeater. Early afternoon returned slowly, stopping toward dusk at good forest edge. Whilst waiting saw Marigold Parakeet and Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher. With nightfall good views obtained of calling Wetar Scops Owl, as well as distant views of hawking Timor Nightjar. Thereafter a long trudge down river in the dark back to the beach - which took almost two hours, with amazingly no one falling over on slippery rocks and boulders.

26 Oct. A late breakfast at 04:15 and out into open forest behind the village. In the forest edge and open grassland we recorded Crimson-hooded Myzomela, Black-necklaced Honeyeater, Ashy-bellied White-eye, Olive-headed Lorikeet, Olive-shouldered Parrot, Little Bronze Cuckoo, Bright-capped Cisticola, White-tufted Honeyeater and Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher. Back to boat to set off for Leti. Around 16:00, toward the eastern tip of Wetar, we stopped the ship and headed for a pristine-looking beach for a couple of hours. Beautiful forest right down to the beach was accessible via a woodcutters track and held Silver-crowned Fruit Dove, Orange-banded Thrush and several Timor Stubtail. A walk down the beach produced the expected, given the remoteness of the beach, Beach Stone-curlew as well a single Pacific Golden Plover. Many turtle tracks on the beach. At dusk, Wetar Scops Owl seen and Timor Nightjar heard. Wetar is an impressive place to bird. Due to the very low population almost the whole island is covered with pristine habitat, with little or no hunting obvious. With no roads, phones or electricity, this appears to be a peaceful forgotten corner of Indonesia. Hard to reach, but worth the effort.

Kisar Friarbird habitat
Kisar Friarbird habitat on Leti

27 Oct. Another choppy night. Arrived 07:00 into Leti, where calm and already pretty warm. Took some time to secure police clearance and collect some local guides and whilst waiting only birds on view in the bay were Little Pied Cormorant and Pacific Swallow. Left boat at 09:00, and walked into scrub in the heat of the day for three hours. Highlight was Kisar Friarbird, fairly common in the palm woodland, as well as several Olive-headed Lorikeet and a single Rufous-sided Gerygone. Back to harbour at lunch just in time to see the ship sailing away around the headland and out of radio contact. Sent Raja on motorcycle along bay to establish radio contact, eventually reaching ship for lunch an hour later as shipped had been moved by the military.

Back into the field and fierce heat at 14:30. Found a wooded valley a couple of kilometres from town and spent the rest of afternoon finding compar form of Yellow-throated Whistler, more Kisar Friarbird and Grey-streaked Flycatcher. At night fall several Savanna Nightjar and three very distant Southern Boobook, none of which seen. The hottest day to date with sunburn and dehydration all round. Late dinner on the ship with departure heavily delayed due to onshore Navy Seals playing games wanting to see passports, passport copies, visas and whatever they could think of in order to try to extract money. Departure toward Damar after midnight.

28 Oct. All night and morning on an open sea almost totally devoid of birds - only a couple of distant boobies and frigatebirds. Arrived at Pulau Terbang Selatan at 14:00 and took a small boat to one of the few sandy beaches. Another small islet in paradise with crystal waters, great snorkeling and a small trail through limestone karst forest with good numbers of Orange-footed Scrubfowl, Silver-crowned Fruit Dove, Black-backed Fruit Dove, Rufous-sided Gerygone and Ashy-bellied White-eye. Later in the afternoon hundreds of Lesser Frigatebird came to roost on the island. Reluctantly left and arrived at Damar around 20:00. On arrival in the cove a boat of drunks came out to cadge cigarettes. Damar really is remote and certainly the most remote spot of our trip. The Damar Flycatcher was originally collected in 1898, and the island was not revisited by ornithologists again until 2001. Talking to the village head, our arrival ten years later was the first foreigners to visit since.

29 Oct. Boat to shore at 05:30 with quite a few of the towns folk turned out to see us. Collected our six porters and guide plus policeman armed to the hilt with Kalashnkov and side arms (very dangerous these Damar Flycatcher), and headed out of town along the bay for a kilometre or so then headed up into the hills on a track that took us through plantations, cut-over forest and a few forest remnants. After an hour we heard our first Damar Flycatcher at 100 metres altitude and a subsequent forest stop at 200 metres produced our first male Damar Flycatcher. Thereafter we hiked up to the ridge at 300 metres, seeing further Damar Flycatcher en route. After lunch on the ridge headed down the other side. Once over the top of the ridge the forest improved and several interesting species encountered including Orange-banded Thrush, Silver-crowned Fruit Dove, Golden Whistler and several more flycatcher Around 16:00 started the return journey. Waited at the 200 metre mark for dusk when we heard an unrecognised Tyto sp. owl calling, then headed back to town owling en route, but seeing none. A Tyto owl is known to be present on Damar, but has never been identified, but is likely either to be Lesser Masked Owl or Eastern Barn Owl. Dinner and overnight on the ship, departing at 03:00.

Babar harbour
Babar harbour

Babar view
Babar habitat

Rock the dog
Rock the dog - Babar beach

Anggarmasa
Anggarmasa beach

Tanimbar
Group in woodland on Tanimbar

30 Oct. Most of the day at sea arriving at Babar 16:30. Our poorest day at sea with little more than a handful of boobies and a single White-tailed Tropicbird seen. At dusk took a walk southwest of the main town, looking for forested habitat. Large-tailed Nightjar fairly common and an hour's effort was eventually rewarded with excellent views of a Southern Boobook of the rich rufous cinnamomina form, which is restricted to Babar.

31 Oct. Back out along the same road as the previous evening. Although from a distance Babar looks well forested, once walking into the habitat it's quite cut over with patchy forest remnants, secondary growth and much cultivation. Hunting is prevalent, with few pigeons heard or seen. A morning walk in the same area had Banda Myzomela, White-bellied Whistler, Cinnamon-tailed Fantail, Torresian Crow and a bucket full of Tricoloured Parrotfinch. Hot by 10:00. A few waders on the shore included Terek Sandpiper, Common Greenshank and Greater Sand Plover. Back to ship, lunch and set off for Tanimbar at 14:00. No seabirds of note.

01 Nov. A bit of a choppy night, but calming by morning. All morning very poor for seabirds, with only the odd tern passing. Just before midday we decided to investigate the small islet of Anggarmasa just off Tanimbar, that probably has never been birded. A walk along the coral beach in the heat of the day produced several Beach Stone-curlew, numerous Pied Imperial Pigeon, Pied Oystercatcher - only the second Indonesian record - plus a pair of Tanimbar Scrubfowl, a difficult bird on the main island. After lunch on the ship we returned again with up to eight Beach Stone-curlew and White-bellied Whistler. Left at 16:30 in order to dock in at Tanimbar harbour before dark. Overnight on the ship.

02 Nov. Onto the quay and waiting for pre-arranged vehicles at 04:30. Unfortunately, even though the drivers had confirmed the time yesterday, no one arrived till 05:30 and one driver failed to turn up at all, necessitating finding another vehicle and eventually underway at 06:15. We drove to a hacked over forest area 21 km from town, arriving around 07:00. First species seen were Wallace's Fruit Dove and Tanimbar Triller along the road. Then walked a short trail in remnant forest for three hours seeing a good selection of specialities including Timor Bush Warbler, Elegant Pitta, Slaty-backed Thrush, Loetoe Monarch and Black-bibbed Monarch. Back to ship for final lunch, then transferred to Galaxy Hotel which was pretty average, but at least not rolling from side to side. Only two of the three arranged vehicles for 15:00 again appeared, so took the hotel bus to travel out along the Yonif road. A very hot afternoon, but some nice birds were found - Tanimbar Friarbird, Blue-streaked Lory and Tanimbar Corella. At dusk readily found Tanimbar Boobook, but a subsequent 4 km walk failed to produce the hoped for Lesser Masked Owl. Late back to hotel.

03 Nov. An 05:00 start, but another fiasco with vehicles and drivers. Only two vehicles again, so we squeezed in and headed off in the two leaving Raja to sort out another vehicle and join us. Back to the forest at Km 21 and took a longer trail through logged and cut over forest for about three kilometres. Similar species to yesterday with a few additionals like Kai Cicadabird, Tanimbar Starling, Long-tailed Fantail and Pied Bronze Cuckoo. Back to the hotel for lunch and a siesta, seeing Little Whimbrel en route right on the roadside. By 15:00 back to the trail at Km 21 but failed to find Fawn-breasted Thrush.

Toward dusk drove about 30 km out along the Yonif road and searched for Lesser Masked Owl. Nothing for the first hour but a bird flying across the road on the return to the hotel led to a screeching halt and was nicely spotlighted for 20 minutes - a really nice end to the day.

04 Nov. Back to the Garden Trail and in four hours added Yellow-throated Whistler and Tanimbar Drongo, but still no Fawn-breasted Thrush. Another break in the heat of the day and back to the same trail at 15:45 for a last attempt. A lucky break for two people who had the thrush fly past, but concerted effort till dusk was unrewarded. Not the perfect end to the day, but a difficult bird, and our first major dip of the trip.

05 Nov. Headed out to the airport, but no Australian Pratincole nor Little Curlew on the airfield. Flight to Ambon only 30 minutes late. On arrival in Ambon headed out onto a forest track just across the road from the airport in the hope of finding Ambon White-eye. No such luck, but did produce a few additions to the trip list - Black Sunbird, Claret-breasted Fruit Dove and Uniform Swiftlet. Connection to Jakarta delayed, so we finally arrived at the FM7 Resort Hotel at 18:00. Highly recommended hotel. Final trip dinner and said farewell. All in all a really excellent trip, with sincere thanks to James and Rob for the years of preparation in setting this up.

06 Nov. Afternoon flight to Bangkok and connection to Chiang Mai went smoothly.

Gallery

Further scenic, people, places and travel images from this trip can be found here.

Species List

Taxonomy and nomenclature follow IOU/IOC World Bird List, version 3.0 (2011). However, a fair number of highly distinctive regional taxa, that are strong candidates for specific status, are included and indicated by trinomial scientific names.

  Flores and its seas  
  Streaked Shearwater Calonectris leucomelas
  Sooty Shearwater Puffinus griseus
  Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii
  Wilson's Storm Petrel Oceanites oceanicus
  Red-billed Tropicbird Phaethon aethereus
  Red-footed Booby Sula sula
  Brown Booby Sula leucogaster
  White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
  Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Eastern Little Tern Sternula albifrons pusilla
  Bridled Tern Onychoprion anaethetus
  Sooty Tern Onychoprion fuscatus
  Black-naped Tern Sterna sumatrana
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  Parasitic Jaeger Stercorarius parasiticus
  Long-tailed Jaeger Stercorarius longicaudus
  Asian Koel Eudynamys scolopaceus
  Cave Swiftlet Collocalia linchi
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
     
  Tanahjampea  
  Orange-footed Scrubfowl Megapodius reinwardt
  Javan Pond Heron Ardeola speciosa
  Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus
  Little Pied Cormorant Microcarbo melanoleucos
  Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
  White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
  Brown Goshawk Accipiter fasciatus
  Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis
  Tanimbar Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia magna timorlaoensis
  Tanahjampea Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia magna longa
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Black-naped Fruit Dove Ptilinopus melanospilus
  Elegant Imperial Pigeon Ducula concinna
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Great-billed Parrot Tanygnathus megalorynchos
  Eastern Barn Owl Tyto delicatula
  Large-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus macrurus
  Cave Swiftlet Collocalia linchi
  Pacific Swift Apus pacificus
  Oriental Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Elegant Pitta Pitta elegans
  Sulawesi Myzomela Myzomela chloroptera
  White-breasted Woodswallow Artamus leucorynchus
  Common Cicadabird Coracina tenuirostris
  White-shouldered Triller Lalage sueurii
  Rusty-breasted Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis fulvotincta
  Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  White-tipped Monarch Symposiachrus everetti
  Island Monarch Monarcha cinerascens
  Broad-billed Flycatcher Myiagra ruficollis
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Lemon-bellied White-eye Zosterops chloris
  Short-tailed Starling Aplonis minor
  Tanahjampea Blue Flycatcher Cyornis djampeanus
  Clement's Sunbird Cinnyris jugularis clementiae
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Black-faced Munia Lonchura molucca
     
  Pantar and its seas  
  Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii
  Wilson's Storm Petrel Oceanites oceanicus
  Swinhoe's Storm Petrel Oceanodroma monorhis
  Striated Heron Butorides striata
  Pacific Reef Egret Egretta sacra
  Lesser Frigatebird Fregata ariel
  Red-footed Booby Sula sula
  Brown Booby Sula leucogaster
  Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis
  Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus
  Brown Noddy Anous stolidus
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Bridled Tern Onychoprion anaethetus
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Barred Dove Geopelia maugeus
  Black-naped Fruit Dove Ptilinopus melanospilus
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Alor Boobook Ninox boobook plesseni
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Rufous-backed Dwarf Kingfisher Ceyx erithaca rufidorsa
  Rainbow Bee-eater Merops ornatus
  Sunda Pygmy Woodpecker Dendrocopos moluccensis
  Helmeted Friarbird Philemon buceroides
  Indonesian Honeyeater Lichmera limbata
  Golden-bellied Gerygone Gerygone sulphurea
  White-breasted Woodswallow Artamus leucorynchus
  Wallacean Cuckooshrike Coracina personata
  Rusty-breasted Whistler Pachycephala fulvotincta
  Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Broad-billed Flycatcher Myiagra ruficollis
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Tree Martin Petrochelidon nigricans
  Lemon-bellied White-eye Zosterops chloris
  Black-fronted Flowerpecker Dicaeum igniferum
  Flame-breasted Sunbird Cinnyris solaris
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
     
  Alor  
  Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
  Australian Hobby Falco longipennis
  White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Black-naped Fruit Dove Ptilinopus melanospilus
  Olive-headed Lorikeet Trichoglossus euteles
  Lesser Coucal Centropus bengalensis
  Rusty-breasted Cuckoo Cacomantis sepulcralis
  Himalayan Cuckoo Cuculus saturatus
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Sunda Pygmy Woodpecker Dendrocopos moluccensis
  Helmeted Friarbird Philemon buceroides
  Indonesian Honeyeater Lichmera limbata
  Golden-bellied Gerygone Gerygone sulphurea
  Wetar Figbird Sphecotheres hypoleucus
  Sunda Drongo Dicrurus densus bimaensis
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Cinereous Tit Parus cinereus
  Tree Martin Petrochelidon nigricans
  Timor Stubtail Urosphena subulata
  Sunda Bush Warbler Cettia vulcania
  Timor Bush Warbler Bradypterus timorensis
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Short-tailed Starling Aplonis minor
  Common Hill Myna Gracula religiosa
  Lesser Shortwing Brachypteryx leucophris
  Pied Bush Chat Saxicola caprata
  Black-fronted Flowerpecker Dicaeum igniferum
  Flame-breasted Sunbird Cinnyris solaris
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea
     
  Wetar and its seas  
  Orange-footed Scrubfowl Megapodius reinwardt
  Red Junglefowl Gallus gallus
  Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii
  White-tailed Tropicbird Phaethon lepturus
  Great Frigatebird Fregata minor
  Red-footed Booby Sula sula
  Brown Booby Sula leucogaster
  White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
  Brown Goshawk Accipiter fasciatus
  Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis
  Bonelli's Eagle Aquila fasciata
  Beach Stone-curlew Esacus magnirostris
  Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus
  Brown Noddy Anous stolidus
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Bridled Tern Onychoprion anaethetus
  Sooty Tern Onychoprion fuscatus
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus
  Pomarine Jaeger Stercorarius pomarinus
  Parasitic Jaeger Stercorarius parasiticus
  Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis
  Bar-necked Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia magna
  Little Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia ruficeps
  Black Dove Turacoena modesta
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Barred Dove Geopelia maugeus
  Wetar Ground Dove Gallicolumba hoedtii
  Black-backed Fruit Dove Ptilinopus cinctus
  Silver-crowned Fruit Dove Ptilinopus regina xanthogaster
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Timor Imperial Pigeon Ducula cineracea
  Marigold Lorikeet Trichoglossus capistratus
  Olive-headed Lorikeet Trichoglossus euteles
  Red-cheeked Parrot Geoffroyus geoffroyi
  Olive-shouldered Parrot Aprosmictus jonquillaceus
  Australian Koel Eudynamys orientalis
  Wetar Scops Owl Otus magicus tempestatis
  Timor Nightjar Caprimulgus macrurus ssp
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  Edible-nest Swiftlet Aerodramus fuciphaga
  Pacific Swift Apus pacificus
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher Todiramphus australasia
  Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis
  Rainbow Bee-eater Merops ornatus
  Helmeted Friarbird Philemon buceroides
  Scaly-breasted Honeyeater Lichmera squamata
  Black-necklaced Honeyeater Lichmera notabilis
  Crimson-hooded Myzomela Myzomela kuehni
  Plain Gerygone Gerygone inornata
  White-breasted Woodswallow Artamus leucorynchus
  Wallacean Cuckooshrike Coracina personata
  White-shouldered Triller Lalage sueurii
  Fawn-breasted Whistler Pachycephala orpheus
  Yellow-throated Whistler Pachycephala macrorhyncha
  Black-headed Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach tricolor
  Wetar Figbird Sphecotheres hypoleucus
  Wetar Oriole Oriolus melanotis finschi
  Wallacean Drongo Dicrurus densus
  Northern Fantail Rhipidura rufiventris
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Spectacled Monarch Symposiachrus trivirgatus
  Island Monarch Monarcha cinerascens
  Broad-billed Flycatcher Myiagra ruficollis
  Large-billed Crow Corvus macrorhynchos
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Timor Stubtail Urosphena subulata
  Timor Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus presbytes
  Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Orange-banded Thrush Geokichla peronii
  Pied Bush Chat Saxicola caprata
  Little Pied Flycatcher Ficedula westermanni
  Timor Blue Flycatcher Cyornis hyacinthinus
  Red-chested Flowerpecker Dicaeum maugei
  Flame-breasted Sunbird Cinnyris solaris
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Red Avadavat Amandava amandava
  Tricoloured Parrotfinch Erythrura tricolor
  Black-faced Munia Lonchura molucca
  Scaly-breasted Munia Lonchura punctulata
  Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis
     
  Leti  
  Pacific Reef Egret Egretta sacra
  Little Black Cormorant Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
  Crested Honey Buzzard Pernis ptilorhynchus
  Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
  Brown Goshawk Accipiter fasciatus
  Spotted Kestrel Falco moluccensis
  Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
  Marsh Sandpiper Tringa stagnatilis
  Grey-tailed Tattler Tringa brevipes
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Red-necked Stint Calidris ruficollis
  Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus
  Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Barred Dove Geopelia maugeus
  Silver-crowned Fruit Dove Ptilinopus regina xanthogaster
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Olive-headed Lorikeet Trichoglossus euteles
  Banda Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx minutillus rufomerus
  Southern Boobook Ninox boobook
  Savanna Nightjar Caprimulgus affinis
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  Pacific Swift Apus pacificus
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Rainbow Bee-eater Merops ornatus
  Kisar Friarbird Philemon kisserensis
  Scaly-breasted Honeyeater Lichmera squamata
  Rufous-sided Gerygone Gerygone dorsalis
  Wallacean Cuckooshrike Coracina personata
  White-shouldered Triller Lalage sueurii
  Moa Yellow-throated Whistler Pachycephala macrorhyncha compar
  Northern Fantail Rhipidura rufiventris
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Spectacled Monarch Symposiachrus trivirgatus
  Large-billed Crow Corvus macrorhynchos
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Grey-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa griseisticta
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Zebra Finch Taeniopygia guttata
  Scaly-breasted Munia Lonchura punctulata
  Paddyfield Pipit Anthus rufulus
     
  Damar  
  Orange-footed Scrubfowl Megapodius reinwardt
  Lesser Frigatebird Fregata ariel
  Red-footed Booby Sula sula
  Eastern Osprey Pandion cristatus
  Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
  White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
  Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus
  Metallic Pigeon Columba vitiensis
  Bar-necked Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia magna
  Common Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica
  Black-backed Fruit Dove Ptilinopus cinctus
  Silver-crowned Fruit Dove Ptilinopus regina xanthogaster
  Elegant Imperial Pigeon Ducula concinna
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Blue-streaked Lory Eos reticulata
  Olive-headed Lorikeet Trichoglossus euteles
  Banda Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx minutillus rufomerus
  Tyto Owl sp Tyto sp
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  Edible-nest Swiftlet Aerodramus fuciphaga
  Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher Todiramphus australasia
  Scaly-breasted Honeyeater Lichmera squamata
  Rufous-sided Gerygone Gerygone dorsalis
  Yellow-throated Whistler Pachycephala macrorhyncha
  Wallacean Whistler Pachycephala arctitorquis
  Northern Fantail Rhipidura rufiventris
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Black-bibbed Monarch Symposiachrus mundus
  Spectacled Monarch Symposiachrus trivirgatus
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Orange-banded Thrush Geokichla peronii
  Damar Flycatcher Ficedula henrici
  Red-chested Flowerpecker Dicaeum maugei
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Black-faced Munia Lonchura molucca
  Five-coloured Munia Lonchura quinticolor
     
  Babar  
  White-tailed Tropicbird Phaethon lepturus
  Pacific Reef Egret Egretta sacra
  Brown Booby Sula leucogaster
  Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
  White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
  Variable Goshawk Accipiter hiogaster
  Greater Sand Plover Charadrius leschenaultii
  Oriental Plover Charadrius veredus
  Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
  Far Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis
  Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia
  Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida
  Feral Pigeon Columba livia
  Pacific Emerald Dove Chalcophaps longirostris
  Barred Dove Geopelia maugeus
  Silver-crowned Fruit Dove Ptilinopus regina xanthogaster
  Olive-headed Lorikeet Trichoglossus euteles
  Banda Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx minutillus rufomerus
  Southern Boobook Ninox boobook
  Large-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus macrurus
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  Edible-nest Swiftlet Aerodramus fuciphaga
  Pacific Swift Apus pacificus
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher Todiramphus australasia
  Scaly-breasted Honeyeater Lichmera squamata
  Banda Myzomela Myzomela boiei
  Rufous-sided Gerygone Gerygone dorsalis
  White-shouldered Triller Lalage sueurii
  Wallacean Whistler Pachycephala arctitorquis
  Cinnamon-tailed Fantail Rhipidura fuscorufa
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Island Monarch Monarcha cinerascens
  Torresian Crow Corvus orru
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Orange-banded Thrush Geokichla peronii
  Pied Bush Chat Saxicola caprata
  Red-chested Flowerpecker Dicaeum maugei
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Tricoloured Parrotfinch Erythrura tricolor
  Five-coloured Munia Lonchura quinticolor
  Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis
     
  Tanimbar  
  Tanimbar Megapode Megapodius tenimberensis
  Great-billed Heron Ardea sumatrana
  Pacific Reef Egret Egretta sacra
  Lesser Frigatebird Fregata ariel
  Red-footed Booby Sula sula
  Brown Booby Sula leucogaster
  Little Pied Cormorant Microcarbo melanoleucos
  Little Black Cormorant Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
  Variable Goshawk Accipiter hiogaster
  Beach Stone-curlew Esacus magnirostris
  Pied Oystercatcher Haematopus longirostris
  Greater Sand Plover Charadrius leschenaultii
  Little Curlew Numenius minutus
  Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
  Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
  Australian Pratincole Stiltia isabella
  Greater Crested Tern Thalasseus bergii
  Common Tern Sterna hirundo
  Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida
  White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus
  Tanimbar Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia magna timorlaoensis
  Pacific Emerald Dove Chalcophaps indica longirostris
  Wallace's Fruit Dove Ptilinopus wallacii
  Silver-crowned Fruit Dove Ptilinopus regina xanthogaster
  Elegant Imperial Pigeon Ducula concinna
  Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon Ducula rosacea
  Pied Imperial Pigeon Ducula bicolor
  Tanimbar Corella Cacatua goffiniana
  Blue-streaked Lory Eos reticulata
  Red-cheeked Parrot Geoffroyus geoffroyi
  Great-billed Parrot Tanygnathus megalorynchos
  Eclectus Parrot Eclectus roratus
  Australian Koel Eudynamys orientalis
  Pied Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx minutillus crassirostris
  Brush Cuckoo Cacomantis variolosus
  Himalayan Cuckoo Cuculus saturatus
  Lesser Masked Owl Tyto sororcula
  Tanimbar Boobook Ninox squamipila forbesi
  Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
  White-throated Needletail Hirundapus caudacutus
  Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
  Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher Todiramphus australasia
  Elegant Pitta Pitta elegans
  Tanimbar Friarbird Philemon plumigenis
  Scaly-breasted Honeyeater Lichmera squamata
  Banda Myzomela Myzomela boiei
  Rufous-sided Gerygone Gerygone dorsalis
  White-breasted Woodswallow Artamus leucorynchus
  Eastern Wallacean Cuckooshrike Coracina personata pollens
  Kai Cicadabird Coracina dispar
  Tanimbar Triller Lalage moesta
  Yellow-throated Whistler Pachycephala macrorhyncha
  Wallacean Whistler Pachycephala arctitorquis
  Tanimbar Oriole Oriolus decipiens
  Tanimbar Drongo Dicrurus densus kuehni
  Cinnamon-tailed Fantail Rhipidura fuscorufa
  Long-tailed Fantail Rhipidura opistherythra
  Arafura Fantail Rhipidura dryas
  Black-bibbed Monarch Symposiachrus mundus
  Island Monarch Monarcha cinerascens
  Loetoe Monarch Monarcha castus
  Broad-billed Flycatcher Myiagra ruficollis
  Shining Flycatcher Myiagra alecto
  Golden-bellied Flyrobin Microeca hemixantha
  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Tanimbar Bush Warbler Cettia carolinae
  Tawny Grassbird Megalurus timoriensis
  Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella
  Metallic Starling Aplonis metallica
  Tanimbar Starling Aplonis crassa
  Slaty-backed Thrush Geokichla schistacea
  Tanimbar Flycatcher Ficedula riedeli
  Tanimbar Flowerpecker Dicaeum hirundinaceum fulgidum
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Scaly-breasted Munia Lonchura punctulata
  Five-coloured Munia Lonchura quinticolor
  Paddyfield Pipit Anthus rufulus
     
  Ambon  
  Feral Pigeon Columba livia
  Claret-breasted Fruit Dove Ptilinopus viridis
  Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
  Metallic Starling Aplonis metallica
  Black Sunbird Leptocoma aspasia
  Clement's Sunbird Cinnyris jugularis clementiae
  Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
  Chestnut Munia Lonchura atricapilla
  Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis